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 アカデミックな技量とともに階層化された制度に厳密に従うことで成立し、存続してきた「日本画」によって中断された日本の絵画を、再考できないかと考えています。

本来、滞りなく流れゆくはずだった日本の絵画の道行きは、現代にどういう風につながるはずだったのか。知りたくて制作を続けています。

 日本特有の文字であるひらがなは、中国から伝わった漢字をもとに、今から約1千年以上前に生み出されました。部首や作りから複雑な意味や読みを持つ漢字を筆による見た目の単純化だけでなく、それ自体に意味はなく、またほとんどの文字は1つの音でしかないという、様々な意味で単純化という作業が行われています。また、そぎ落とす、という意味での単純化は達磨を祖とする禅宗からわひさびという日本独自の思想にも言えます。これは日本独特の「型」に置き換える行為でもあります。そしてその「型」はブルーノタウトによって賞賛され、バウハウスなどのモダン建築にも影響を与えたことは周知の事実です。

I wonder whether there is a way to revise painting in Japan, which has been suspended at "Japanese painting" - dependent and formed upon academic techniques and strictly committing to a hierarchised system.

How would the path of painting in Japan be connected to the present, if it had flowed, uninterrupted, as it originally should have? I paint in desire to know.

  In composing art, I reference and recreate a range of stylistic and other elements including from Japanese art, and particularly in the styles of the Rimpa school, Kano school and traditional Japanese painting. Patterns, history, and thought are things the shaping of which is heavily dependent on a given locale and environment. Therefore, I think that by consciously making such references, it is possible to create pictures that only a contemporary Japanese person could paint.

 

  Simplification is an especially Japanese mode of expression. Examples include the invention by Japanese more than 1,000 years ago of the hiragana syllabary of unique symbols created through the simplification of Chinese characters. In the Kamakura Period, too, there was the emergence of the concept of wabi-sabi through the adoption and simplification of Zen Buddhism originated by Bodhidharma. I also think about the extent to which I can create a work that is my own, amid modern and later styles with the value they place on drawing from life, and on materials.

 

  I create pictures composed in today's Japan by discovering new meaning within the styles of traditional Japanese painting, and in simplification such as the one-stroke sketch of a flower that is a part of the culture of the fude ink brush.